peninsula-chiropractic
183 Woodland Rd

Hampton, VA 23663
(Corner of Pembroke Ave & Woodland Rd)

Call 757-723-3893

• 50 years of combined experience

• Same Day appointments available

• Most insurances accepted, including auto insurance

• We file accident claims

• M.D. on staff

• Mention this site and speak directly with a doctor!

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Let me tell you a true story about a real man, a man’s man, who happened to be a carpenter. John Doe, lets call him John, had some back pain that had been getting progressively worse for the past six months. He had not been to see a doctor since his last football physical in college. He had never been seriously injured and had never spent a night in the hospital. He finally went to see his family doctor because he developed some blood in his urine. He never admitted the back pain to his doctor.  His family physician referred him to a urologist. John’s little problem disappeared the next day and he never went to see the urologist. His back pain was tolerable. Over the next 18 months John continued to have pains in his back but dismissed them as work related. A large man, 6’ 1” and 240 pounds- he continued his daily activity including some heavier construction projects. He continued to ignore his symptoms until the blood returned in his urine. John returned to his family physician with a complaint of low back pain and casually remarked that “oh yea and that blood is still there”.  John was convinced to see the urologist who in-turn referred him to a specialist. The specialist removed a tumor from his kidney. John is unfortunately representative of the model male patient.  His story is just a little more illustrative of how men make poor health choices.  Gentlemen we should be ashamed of ourselves!  We are supposed to be the intellectual problem solvers of our species.  When it comes to our health we are woefully inadequate compared to our female counterparts. Did you know that most family practices, chiropractors, dentists, and podiatrists see primarily women?  This is true of my practice as well. Did you know men make 135 million fewer doctor’s visits a year than women do? A survey taken in 1999 found that about 30 million men hadn’t been to a doctor for a health check-up in the previous year. About 9 million men said they hadn’t seen a doctor in five years.  Another survey found that one-third of men in America age 45 to 64 had never had their cholesterol checked. Sadly, because we neglect our health, we pay the consequences.  On average, men die seven years before most women.  The death rate for heart disease is twice as high for men as it is for women.  Lung cancer kills about 95,000 men each year, compared to 65,000 women. Men also have higher death rates from emphysema, accidents, murder, suicide, and alcohol-related conditions.

 

Are we really that dumb or are we just genetically predispositioned to poor health?  It’s not our genes. Unfortunately we are poorly educated consumers.  Men  know very little about their bodies, they’re too embarrassed to say so, and when they have a problem, they don’t know where to turn for help. Many men think consulting a doctor is an admission of weakness.  Any worrying about a health problem that doesn’t land them flat on their backs isn’t manly.  Would John Wayne have complained of urinary problems?  I don’t think so.  Our model man, John, probably learned from a young age to grit his teeth and bare it.  The following is a list of commonly used excuses and their possible hidden meanings borrowed from Better Homes and Gardens (probably written by a woman).

 
Excuses used by men to dodge the doctor:The real reason:
“I’m too busy”My co-workers will think I’m weak, lazy, or getting old when I take time from work.  It could jeopardize my job.
“I don’t trust the doctor”Do not like giving up control or depending on others.
“I don’t want to make a big deal out of it”I am afraid of bad news, if I ignore the problem it will go away.
“I already know what they’ll say”The doctor might tell me to change my lifestyle. 
“I can’t talk to my doctor”I am embarrassed and I will have to admit I don’t know much about this problem.

So what’s the answer?  Men need to realize that the traditional masculine role can be hazardous to their health.  Men need to see doctors as allies and become more educated about their health.  So what should we be doing and when should we be doing it? This chart should get you started.  To use the last column and last chart: assume if you are age 20 to 59 your life expectancy would be 73, if you are age 60 to 69 your life expectancy would be 76, and if you are age 70 to 79 your life expectancy would be 78. 

Age

Examination

How often?

Why?

How will this affect my life expectancy?

20Regular PhysicalEvery 5 years.Screen for major health problems and catch them early enough to help. 
50Regular PhysicalEvery year.Screen for major health problems and catch them early enough to help. 
20Blood pressure screenEvery 2 years.High blood pressure doubles a person’s risk for heart disease and triples it for stroke. High is pressure that persists over 140/90.Bp 90/65 to 120/81 add 3 yearsBp 121/82 to 129/85 add 1 yearBp 131/87 to 140/90 subtract 1 year
50Blood pressure screenEvery year.High blood pressure doubles a person’s risk for heart disease and triples it for stroke. High is pressure that persists over 140/90.Bp 141/95 to 150/95 subtract 2 yearsBp more than 151/96 subtract 3 years
20 & overCholesterol screenEvery 5 years after age 20.High Cholesterol is a major factor for heart disease. Below 200 = good, above 240 = bad.Less than 160 add 1 year201 to 240 subtract 1 year241 to 280 subtract 2 yearsmore than 280 subtract 3 years
50Stool blood testEvery year.Early detection of colon cancer. If you have a family history start at age 40. 
50SigmoidoscopyEvery 3 to 5 years.An inspection of the colon for  pre-cancerous polyps. 
40PSA blood testEvery year.A blood test that can be done with a regular physical that screens for prostate problems. 
35 and youngerTesticular examSelf exam every month.Cancer of the testicle is the most common cancer in men between 15 and 35. 
 
If you are a cigarette smoker:           Never smoked then add 3 years                                         Ex-smoker not smoked for 5 years then add 2 years                                         Ex-smoker not smoked for 3 years then add 2 years                                         Ex-smoker not smoked for 1 year then subtract 1 year                                         Smoke 1 pack per day or less for less than 20 years then subtract 2 years                                         Smoke 1 pack per day or less for more than 20 years then subtract 3 years
Do you exercise?:           90 minutes of exercise per day for more than 3 years then add 3 years                                         60 minutes of exercise per day for more than 3 years then add 2 years                                         20 minutes of exercise 3 times per week for more than 3 years then add 1 year                                         More than 5 minutes of exercise per day for more than 3 years then subtract a year                                          Less than 5 minutes of exercise per day for more than 3 years then subtract two years                                          If you do not exercise at all then subtract 3 years

Dr. Kevin S. Steele, D.C.

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